Tag: privacy

Tag: privacy

The Ethics of Digital Phenotyping
June 11, 2023 Gender Cassandra Miller

Your Phone Can’t Read Your Mind. Or Can It? The Ethics of Using Digital Data to Infer Signs and Symptoms of Psychological and Neurological Diseases By Cassandra Miller Imagine a future where your iPhone can detect early signs of Alzheimer’s, or a future where a doctor can monitor a depressive patient solely based on their

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Unlocking and Unleashing All Genomes
March 9, 2023 Genetically Modified Life Ariel Sykes

Unlocking and Unleashing All Genomes: Is This Even Up to You? By Emma Littlejohn Imagine a world where your whole existence and what people viewed you as was entirely based on your genome. Even though, you did not ask to find out things such as your probability to obtain a certain disease in the future:

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The Co-Ownership of Genetic Information between Biological Parent and Child
February 8, 2023 The Genetic Self Ariel Sykes

Yours, Mine and Ours: The Co-Ownership of Genetic Information between Biological Parent and Child By Sara Ramaswamy Should your genetic information belong to you? Parents, is it your duty to provide your genetic information to your children in their medical interest? Children, do you have an ethical claim on your parents’ genetic information? What would

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Should Athletes Test for Gene Doping?
December 14, 2020 Brave New World Apara Sharma

Testing for Gene Doping: A Necessity or Invasion of Privacy? By Tara Balan For decades now, athletes have been using numerous techniques to enhance their performance in competitions. While the most common approach was to use drugs that increased muscle capacity or decreased recovery time, technology has  advanced in our brave new world to find

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Home Genetic Testing, Helpful or Harmful?
June 26, 2020 Brave New World Apara Sharma

$99 for a Lifetime of Worries: The Ethical Implications of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing By  Arden Meyer This research paper explores the widely popular direct-to-consumer genetic test, 23andme, and participants’ potential sacrifice of privacy and autonomy. These sacrifices create risks of genetic exploitation, genetic discrimination, and unnecessary angst about an individuals future state of health. Many

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